first_img Since 2014/15, this beacon of knowledge and education, which sits majestically in the community for which it is named, has copped the primary school category of the Scientific Research Council’s (SRC) annual National Science and Technology Fair and Competition, with a number of outstanding entries. Prev 1of2 Next Story Highlights Seaview Gardens Primary School student, Rihanna Hinds (right), applies the ‘So Real’ sorrel-based cleaning agent to a whiteboard at the institution to demonstrate its effectiveness. Looking on (from left) are Jadon Willis, Kashif Dwyer and Sue Ann Jones. The innovation won the school the top prize in the primary school category of the Scientific Research Council’s (SRC) 2017/18 National Science and Technology Fair and Competition.Seaview Gardens Primary School student, Rihanna Hinds (right), applies the ‘So Real’ sorrel-based cleaning agent to a whiteboard at the institution to demonstrate its effectiveness. Looking on (from left) are Jadon Willis, Kashif Dwyer and Sue Ann Jones. The innovation won the school the top prize in the primary school category of the Scientific Research Council’s (SRC) 2017/18 National Science and Technology Fair and Competition. Jadon Willis, who is also 11 and will be attending Wolmer’s Boys’ School in September, says he loves science.“I am very adventurous… and I really like to explore. That is the main reason why I am so interested in science… because (it covers) a wide variety of things. You can think of something… and there is always a possible way to create it,” adds the former Deputy Head Boy and Science Club Captain.Likewise, Sue-Ann Jones believes science enables persons to learn something new every day.“You get to explore things you never knew before and have mind-boggling experiences and create things that no one knew could happen or that they could invent,” says the 13-year-old, who is on her way to José Martí High School.She credits her teachers, whom she says have “taught us well”, adding “without them, we wouldn’t have won four years in a row”.For 12-year-old Akail Black, being a member of the Science Club has encouraged him to do his own experiments at home, such as making television antennas. “I get to explore things in science that I didn’t know before,” he says.Akail, who will attend Norman Manley High School, says he is “inspired” by the school’s performance in the annual competition, and credits the enthusiasm and dedication of his peers and Mrs. Rose Taylor for her role in preparing them.Kashif Dwyer, for his part, says that being a member of the Science Club has enabled him to do his own research and present his ideas, pointing out that “everyone has an opportunity to shine.”The 11-year-old is on his way to Camperdown High School.The other team members are Janay Williams, who will attend Meadowbrook High School, and Shawn Bull, who will return to Seaview for the 2018/19 academic year.Mrs. Rose Taylor says she is encouraged by the passion displayed towards science, not just by the club members, but all of the students.“In these days, for teachers to be able to get students to participate and maintain their interest in science, because they naturally acquire the passion for it, is a plus,” she tells JIS News.Meanwhile, Mrs. Reid Prince says she is looking forward to “blazing the trail” once again, in the 2018/19 renewal of the SRC Science and Technology Fair and Competition.“Most definitely! We are going back to the drawing board and we are going to brainstorm in preparation for next year,” the Science Club Coordinator emphatically states.last_img